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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of M. persicae and potato leaf roll virus found in the catalog.

M. persicae and potato leaf roll virus

Sue Wolf

M. persicae and potato leaf roll virus

by Sue Wolf

  • 180 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Huxley College of Environmental Studies, Western Washington State College in Bellingham, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Green peach aphid.,
  • Potato leafroll virus.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementSue Wolf.
    SeriesProblem series - Huxley College of Environmental Studies, Western Washington State College, Problem series (Huxley College of Environmental Studies)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination21 leaves :
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13588272M

    M. persicae i.e. aphid per potato leaf and culminated in enhancing the number of associated natural enemies of M. persicae per potato comprising ladybird beetle (), syrphid fly (), green lacewing (), parasitoid mummies (). Also highest yield ( tones ha-1) was recorded from the same treatments. Imidacloprid 25% WP. In further experiments on the transmission of potato leaf-roll virus by Myzus persicae (Sulz.) [cf. preceding abstract], examples of the aphid were injected with extracts from individuals that had fed on plants of Physalis floridana infected with the virus for 1, 2 or 4 days; the aphids receiving the injections were then transferred to a healthy seedling of P. floridana each day for 10 : M. Sugawara, M. Kojima, D. Murayama.

    Myzus persicae is the most important aphid virus vector, being capable of transmitting over persistent and non-persistent virus diseases. These include such extremely debilitating diseases as potato leaf roll virus, potato virus Y (PVY), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), several viruses of tobacco and others. Powell DM, Mondor WT. Area control of the green peach aphid on peach and the reduction of potato leaf roll virus. American Potato Journal Shean B, Cranshaw WS. Differential susceptibilities of green peach aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) and two endoparasitoids (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae and Braconidae) to pesticides.

    Virus-vector relationship between Potato leafroll virus PLRV and Myzus persicae Sulzer. Bulg. J. Agric. Sci., Experiments were carried out to determine the periods of acquisition, latent period, inoculation and retention of Potato leaf roll virus when transmitted by the green peach aphid. Trials were set up with the indicators Physalis. Weather patterns that influence seasonal abundance of green peach aphid (myzus persicae) and spread of potato leaf roll virus in the northern Great .


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M. persicae and potato leaf roll virus by Sue Wolf Download PDF EPUB FB2

Summary. Young potato plants were a better source of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) for aphids, Myzus persicae (Sulz.), than old ones. For plants 6, and 9 weeks old, the best sources of PLRV were the lower, middle and upper leaves, respectively. The frequency of PLRV transmission from upper leaves did not change much with increasing age Cited by: 4.

In an experiment using excised Physalis floridana leaves, twice as many M. persicae settled on virus-infected leaves as on noninfected control leaves. Taken together, the results indicate that arrestment of M. persicae on potato leaf roll virus-infected plants may be due to enhanced nutritional qualities resulting from disease, but not from.

By P. Hamm and C. Ocamb. Cause The Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) is transmitted by at least 10 species of aphids, in a persistent manner. Once an aphid acquires the virus, it can transmit it for life, but not pass it on to its offspring.

The green peach aphid is the most important vector in our area. Several species of aphids feed on potatoes throughout the world; the most important are green peach aphid M.

persicae, potato aphid M. euphorbiae, Buckthorn aphid Aphis nasturtii, and Foxglove aphid Aulacorthum solani; they may vector several damaging viruses in a persistent or nonpersistent manner. Virus transmission is of highest concern for growing seed potatoes. The virus causing potato leaf roll can be recovered from the haemolymph of Myzus pefsicae, the aphid vector.

Infective virus has also been separated from the bodies of infected vectors. The virus can be transmitted by an aphid after a moult, and infectivity is retained for at least 8 days; during this time the aphid is able to infect many plants. persicae is a much more efficient Cited by: Potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) is one of the most important viruses infecting members of Solanaceae family.

Among the members of Solanaceae family, potato crop is the most significant host of PLRV. The PLRV belongs to genus Polerovirus in the family Luteoviridae. Loughnane's () claim that leaf‐roll virus is transmitted by starved aphids that feed for only 5 min.

on infected potato plants was not confirmed. The shortest infection‐feeding time in which M. persicae aphids became infective was 2 hr.; such aphids did not infect healthy plants in the first 2 days and, when transferred to a series of healthy plants at intervals, infected only by: For example, Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) have been shown to attract or arrest aphid vectors as a result of changes in volatile organic compounds emitted by the host plant (Eigenbrode et al.Jimé nezÐMartõ´nez et al.

b, BosqueÐPé rez and Eigenbrode ). Evidence for lack of propagation of potato leaf roll virus in its aphid vector, Myzus persicae. Phytopathology Two isolates of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) were used in serial passage PLRV. Injected insects survived about 16 days and inoculated an average of tests with the green peach aphid, Myzuspersicae.

Plants ofSolanum brevidens graft-inoculated with potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) grew vigorously and had a normal healthy appearance. Although presence of the virus was confirmed in all inoculated plants by graft tests to potato and/orDatura stramonium, recovery of PLRV fromS.

brevidens PI usingPhysalis floridana and the aphidMyzus persicae was Cited by:   The influence of viral disease symptoms on the behaviour of virus vectors has implications for disease epidemiology. Here we show that previously reported preferential colonization of potatoes infected by potato leafroll virus (genus Polerovirus) (luteovirus) (PLRV) by alatae of Myzus persicae, the principal aphid vector of PLRV, is influenced by Cited by: POTATO LEAF ROLL VIRUS IN SEED POTATO FIELDS AT PUKEKOHE By B.

TILL * (Received 27 October ) ABSTRACT In recent years potato seed crops at Pukekohe have shown high levels of leaf roll virus infection, in spite of the use of insecticides. Laboratory and field tests have shown that although insecticides control.

Potato leafroll virus (PLRV), which is primarily transmitted by the potato-peach aphid (Myzus persicae), causes one of the most serious diseases of potato (Solanum tuberosum) worldwide, reducing crop yield by %. The objectives of my proposed research are to investigate the molecular mechanisms that underpin potato-M.

Commenting on Whitehead's observations in connexion with the efficiency of Myzus circumflexus[Aulacorthum circumflexum] as a transmitter of potato leaf roll [R.A.M., ix, p. ], the writer points out that this insect is almost exclusively confined to the greenhouse, whereas M.

persicae is not only one of the commonest potato-feeding aphids in the field, but is a Cited by: 1. PLRV is transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner- once an aphid acquires the virus it is infective for life.

The virus is picked up by colonising aphids during prolonged feeding on an infected plant. The peach potato aphid (Myzus persicae) is regarded as the most efficient vector. Chemical Control As M. persicae is mainly important as a virus vector, a high level of control as provided by insecticides is often required.

However, insecticides are relatively ineffective for non-persistent viruses, because transmission by the aphid occurs in just a few seconds.

In an experiment using excised Physalis floridana leaves, twice as many M. persicae settled on virus-infected leaves as on noninfected control leaves.

Taken together, the results indicate that arrestment of M. persicae on potato leaf roll virus-infected plants may be due to enhanced nutritional qualities resulting from disease, but not from direct encounter with or detection of Cited by: 9. Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) is transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner.

Although virus circulation within the aphid leading to transmission has been well characterized, the mechanisms involved in virus recognition at aphid membranes are still poorly understood.

One isolate in our collection (PLRV) has been shown to be non- or only poorly transmitted by some clones Cited by:   In an experiment using excised Physalis floridana leaves, twice as many M. persicae settled on virus-infected leaves as on noninfected control leaves.

Taken together, the results indicate that arrestment of M. persicae on potato leaf roll virus-infected plants may be due to enhanced nutritional qualities resulting from disease, but not from Cited by: 9. Transmission efficiency of Tunisian Potato leaf-roll virus isolates by Tunisian clones of the Myzus persicae complex (Hemiptera: Aphididae) F.

DJILANI KHOUADJA, J. ROUZÉ-JOUAN, JP. GAUTHIER, S. BOUHACHEM, M. MARRAKCHI, H. FAKHFAKH Potato leqfroll virus (PLRV) is naturally transmitted by aphids, especially by the. These symptoms could easily be mistaken for those incited by potato leaf roll virus but they were strikingly different from the yellow netting of plants infected with the turnip latent virus virus–vector studies with the new virus and M.

persicae, an occasional aphid acquired the virus in 2 hours and 14% of infective insects Cited by: 6.In some years, usually following a particularly mild winter, Peach-Potato aphids can present a very high risk of virus transmission, particularly Leaf Roll, within the Scottish seed potato crop.

Prolonged exposure to low winter temperatures are known to have lethal and sub-lethal effects on populations of M. persicae which, in Scotland. Syller J, The influence of temperature on transmission of potato leaf roll virus by Myzus persicae Sulz.

Potato Research, 30(1) Tamada T; Harrison BD; Roberts IM, Variation among British isolates of potato leafroll virus. Annals of Applied Biology, (1) Thomas JE,